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Posts Tagged ‘Blue Ridge Parkway’

A Bed of Roses Premier Blue Ridge Hiking Package

March 31st, 2014 by abedofroses

The Blue Ridge Parkway just North of Asheville

The Blue Ridge Parkway just North of Asheville

The Blue Ridge Parkway and Western North Carolina have abundant and incredibly scenic hiking trails complete with stunning waterfalls and mountain views and we can help you discover them!

Stay at A Bed of Roses B&B and get off to a great start to your adventures with a healthy and delicious 2-course gourmet breakfast.

We will provide you with your choice of definitive trail guides from Pisgah Map Company, now featuring elevation profiles. Choose either the South Pisgah Ranger District guide, including Bent Creek or the DuPont State Recreational Forest guide. These are gorgeously produced by a local company with local knowledge and include clearly labeled trail names, must-see waterfalls and descriptions of popular mountain bike rides.

DOUGH- chef owned bakery/market/eatery

DOUGH- chef owned bakery/market/eatery

For lunch on the trail we will provide a choice of boxed lunches from DOUGH, an innovative chef-owned market, bakery, eatery and cooking school located right here in North Asheville. Choices include wraps or hoagies, including vegetarian or gluten free options with fruit and one of 3 varieties of Route 66 chips.

Your goody bag also comes complete with a survival bracelet. This is not just an attractive piece of jewelry, it can be deployed to help you in case of emergencies.

Survival Bracelets- not just  jewelry!

Survival Bracelets- not just jewelry!

Each bracelet contains 10-12 feet of MIL-Spec 550 Paracord when unraveled. Paraviral produces these bracelets and gives directions and suggestions for using them for tent repair, fishing, construction of an emergency shelter or hauling up to 550 lbs.

After your day of hiking look forward to a relaxing warm soak in one of our jetted tubs. Wrap yourself in a luxurious robe and enjoy a cup of tea with our delicious home baked cookies.

This package is available with a stay in any of our unique guest rooms for $50.

Book this package with your room reservation >>

A Section of Blue Ridge Parkway North of Asheville Closed Due to a Large Crack. Parkway South from Asheville to Cherokee Still Open.

July 19th, 2013 by abedofroses

View from the Blue Ridge Parkway

The Blue Ridge Parkway North of Asheville

On July 12th a Park Ranger made a stunning discovery. A large crack, 150 feet long, 4 inches wide and in some places 6 feet deep had developed right down the center line of the The Blue Ridge Parkway just north of Asheville. Since that time the crack has grown to 200 feet long and 8 inches wide forcing the closure of a 20 mile stretch of the scenic highway to cars. Apparently the ground below the crack has been saturated with the heavy rains that have left our area lush and green this summer. Cars traveling from Asheville to Mount Mitchell, the highest mountain peak in the eastern US, are being detoured to I40 and US221 through Spruce Pine. Cyclists and hikers can still access the road, at least until repairs begin. July and October are the busiest months of the year for visitors to the Asheville area and the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Looking Glass Falls in Pisgah National Forest

Looking Glass Falls in Pisgah National Forest

Luckily there is still access to all areas of the Parkway from Asheville south to Cherokee which includes The Folk Art Center and the Blue Ridge Parkway Visitors Center. This section of the Parkway offers beautiful views, plenty of hiking trails, Mount Pisgah and the Pisgah National Forest, Graveyard Fields, Devil’s Courthouse and the Cradle of Forestry Overlook. Asheville is ideally located to provide easy access to outdoor activities and beautiful scenery, from the waterfalls of Dupont State Forest to rafting along the French Broad River or a visit to the North Carolina Arboretum with beautiful gardens as well as wooded trails. Chimney Rock and Lake Lure are close as well.

Chimney Rock

Chimney Rock Park

There is still plenty to see and do in the area. Asheville itself has beautiful views and hosts events all summer long. The Craft Fair of the Southern Highlands, with over 300 exhibitors is here this weekend and Bele Cher, the largest free music and arts street festival in the Southeast is here next weekend. Folkmoot USA, a two week celebration of world cultures with international folk music and dance is going on right now. Just a few of the other festivals this summer include the Mountain Dance & Folk Festival August 1-3,  The Village Art & Craft Fair on the Grounds of the All Souls Cathedral in Biltmore Village on Aug. 3-4 and the LAAFF music and arts street fair on Labor Day weekend. A great place to get information on summer festivals as well as the many outdoor activities in the Asheville area is www.romanticasheville.com.

Autumn Colors in Asheville – Saying Goodbye to October in the Mountains of Western North Carolina

November 5th, 2012 by abedofroses

Autumn Leaves on the Blue Ridge Parkway

Late Autumn Leaves on the Blue Ridge Parkway

The colors have become more muted around Asheville, with tones or rust and gold, but the mountains never cease to be breathtaking. As innkeepers, we are often too busy in October to get out to see the peak fall colors, but we managed to get away last week to the Blue Ridge Parkway and Mount Pisgah to see the last colors before the leaves fall and we begin to busy ourselves with Thanksgiving and Christmas preparations. We began the drive with the Folk Art Center. We can never resist a stroll through the galleries of traditional and modern local crafts and fine art. From there we headed south, where the colors brightened.

The French Broad River in late Fall

The French Broad River

Late autumn has it’s own charms. The woods are less impenetrable with fewer leaves allowing you to see deep into them and appreciate the topography of the land. As we climbed we first were treated to views of the French Broad River and then overlook after overlook of mountain views and rich color. A partly cloudy day is often a more interesting time to visit the mountains than a sunny one. The skies and the hillsides become more dramatic.

Late Fall Foliage in the Mountains

Climbing toward Mt. Pisgah

As we got to the top of Mount Pisgah we found ourselves in the clouds winding through the tunnels as the fog rolled around us. At that elevation with the cold snap we were having last week I was a little nervous about snow, but we were lucky and the sun shone as we descended the other side. We circled around through the Pisgah National Forest past the Cradle of Forestry and stopped at Looking Glass Falls before heading home. It was a lovely afternoon.

Looking Glass Falls

Looking Glass Falls

So now the pumpkin has been carved, the trick-or treaters (169 of them!) have come and gone and Thanksgiving is almost here.

The temperature has warmed up again in the afternoons dipping down to the high 30s at night and the leaves are holding their own. It’s not quite time to say goodbye to them yet! By then Christmas will almost be here. The Biltmore Estate has already put up the 35 foot Christmas Tree and their Candlelight Evening tours start in just a few days!

 

How to Beat the Heat – A Scenic Picnic on Mount Mitchell

July 28th, 2012 by abedofroses

Riding along the Blue Ridge Parkway

Mountains along the Blue Ridge Parkway

The highest mountain peak this side of the Mississippi is a quick drive from Asheville. On a fun day-trip the other day the temperature dropped from an unusually steamy 88° in Asheville to a pleasant 66° on the mountaintop. The scenic “slow” route up the Blue Ridge Parkway takes about an hour with spectacular views, woods and scenic overlooks along the way.

Craggy Gardensare definitely worth a stop with scenic trails, picnic areas and a Visitor’s Center. In June and July the rhododendrons are blooming and form a blazing tunnel of flowers along the Craggy Pinnacle trail. The gnarly trees are sweet birch I think- striking in the wintertime.

View from Craggy Gardens Visitor Center

The view from Craggy Gardens Visitor Center

Mount Mitchellis not that far beyond Craggy Gardens. A left on NC Highway 128 from the Parkway takes you right to the summit. Well not exactly. From the parking lot there is a steep little hike along a paved trail to the observation deck, so you can truly say you “climbed Mount Mitchell”! The views from the observation deck are well worth the little climb. At 6,684 feet above sea level you’re likely to see clouds below you and weather forming miles away. The climate at the peak is more like Canada than North Carolina and the vegetation and even the birds are different than just 35 miles away in Asheville.

Climbing to the summit of Mount Mitchell

Climbing the path to the summit of Mount Mitchell

A shaded picnic area at the lower summit parking area was a lovely place to have lunch. There were shelters there as well as picnic tables and grills.

Originally it was thought that Grandfather Mountainwas the highest peak in the area, but in 1835 Dr. Elisha Mitchell, a professor at University of North Carolina calculated the elevation using barometric pressure readings and mathematical formulas to prove that the Black Mountains, the range that Mount Mitchell is a part of, were higher.

Coud moving in over the mountain

A cloud creeps in over the mountain

Of course there was controversy and on a subsequent visit to verify his measurements in 1857 Dr. Mitchell fell from a cliff above a 40 ft waterfall and drowned in the water below. The peak was named in honor of his work in 1858 and he was reburied on top of Mount Mitchell a year after his death.

Until this time the Black Mountain Range was referred to as a single mountain since it’s ridgeline has such an even elevation. Although the elevation of the range is higher, its length is just 15 miles, much smaller than the Blue Ridge Mountains or the Great Smokies. As early as 1787 botanists prized the area for it’s diverse specimens of trees, shrubs and plants. They would bring samples back to Europe to cultivate on royal plantations.

View from Mount Mitchell

View from the summit of Mount Mitchell

The Fraser Fir is named after one such explorer, Englishman John Fraser. The Fraser fir is the most abundant tree along the mountain crest and unfortunately, it has been hit hard by the Wooly Adelgids. An unwelcome visitor that made the trip to the US from Europe around 1900, this tiny insect has destroyed forests throughout the east as well as the northwest. Mount Mitchell was the first place in the southern Appalachians to be invaded by the pest beginning back in 1957, probably because of the high elevation.

Luckily for us the views are still pristine in spite of the Adelgids and the woods are filled with a great variety of trees and shrubs as well as wildflowers. We returned to Asheville refreshed, full from our picnic and a whole lot cooler.

See our Photo Gallery for more pictures!

Fall Foliage in the Mountains of Western NC- Asheville’s the Place

July 31st, 2011 by abedofroses

Fall Foliage on the Blue Ridge Parkway

Fall Foliage on the Blue Ridge Parkway

Asheville is at the tail end of 3 days of the Bele Chere Summer Festival right now. Four sound stages are set up with live music, artists from all over the country are selling their crafts, street performers, food vendors, and cold beers, many locally crafted are everywhere. It been hot in Asheville and misting tents are set up downtown to keep the revelers cool. All of Asheville seems to be one big summer party.

But I’m remembering those cool nights of autumn in the mountains right now! Guests are calling with October reservations and asking for Fall Foliage predictions and it seems a million years away from this summer heat with all of its festivals, but it’s not!  Before you know it the colors will start appearing, first at the mountaintops and then in glorious bands, working their way down the mountains. All the different elevations in the area mean one of the longest-running fall foliage seasons in the country. The days are still warm in the fall and the sun illuminates the brilliant colors. The Blue Ridge Parkway near Asheville is full of great places to view the show, take a hike, stop for a picnic and take in the breathtaking views of the mountains. The Parkway may even add a rest stop soon with views of the Asheville skyline. We’ll keep you posted! Navitat has zipline tours through the forest canope that are even more beautiful and peaceful in the fall. Soaring through the treetops, you will suddenly come upon a stunning mountain vista on your way to the next landing flatform in the trees. A guided canoe trip down the French Broad River offers a unique view of the colors. You may even want to enjoy the panorama of the blazing mountains from a balloon ride across the Hominy Valley! And of course, The Biltmore Estate and Gardens are a thing to behold in the Fall with the Biltmore Forest in full autumn glory rising behind the mansion and the gardens specially planted for the season.

Whether you’re exploring in Dupont State Forest, climbing Chimney Rock or visiting Pisgah National Forest, during the day, Asheville is the perfect place to come home to. At the end of the day you’ll find plenty to do in downtown Asheville. The nights cool off just enough to enjoy a sweater while you eat outside at one of Asheville’s many sidewalk cafés. Asheville has a myriad of great independent restaurants, most emphasizing locally grown foods. There’s sure to be live music in town and artists displaying their work outside the Grove Arcade or at the Art in the Park Series at Pack Square. If you’re in the mood for theater, October offers everything from Romeo and Juliet with the Montford Park Players, to Angels in America with the North Carolina Stage Company.

The color show is predicted to start this October 4 through the 14th at the highest elevations above 5,000 feet just north of Asheville. Look for color on Mount Mitchell, Craggy Gardens or Grandfather Mountain. October 12th through the 21st look to the mountains southwest of Asheville on the Blue Ridge Parkway including Mount Pisgah and Devil’s Courthouse.  October 18th through the 26th the mountains surrounding Asheville along the Blue Ridge Parkway should be at peak color, between 3,000 and 4,000 feet. October 26th through November 5th the show shines brightest right in Asheville itself at 2,000 feet. This is the time to visit the NC Arboretum or Dupont State Forest. The Biltmore Estate will be at peak color then as well. October 27th to November 6th look to Lake Lure and the Chimney Rock area.

 

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